5 killed, hundreds of structures destroyed as explosive Carr Fire blazes into Redding, California

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The deadly Carr Fire burning in Northern California continues to threaten thousands of homes in Redding, California, after nearly doubling in size on Friday night.

The raging inferno has killed five people since igniting on Monday, July 23, after the mechanical failure of a vehicle, according to Cal Fire.

Cal Fire. Three firefighters have suffered burns.” data-reactid=”13″>On Thursday, a bulldozer operator was killed while working to clear vegetation in the path of the blaze, according to a statement from Cal Fire. Three firefighters have suffered burns.

Officials announced early Friday that a Redding city firefighter had died battling the blaze.
” data-reactid=”14″>Officials announced early Friday that a Redding city firefighter had died battling the blaze.

Associated Press (AP).” data-reactid=”17″>Two young children and their great-grandmother died after the flames overtook the family’s property, according to the Associated Press (AP).

83,000 acres with minimal containment, jumped the Sacramento River on Thursday night and headed toward the city of Redding, which is home to nearly 92,000 people.” data-reactid=”18″>The wildfire, which has consumed over 83,000 acres with minimal containment, jumped the Sacramento River on Thursday night and headed toward the city of Redding, which is home to nearly 92,000 people.

The erratic nature of the blaze has made the fire difficult to contain.

told the Los Angeles Times.” data-reactid=”20″>”[The Carr Fire] was moving all over the place,” Mike Mohler, deputy communications director for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, told the Los Angeles Times.

AccuWeather meteorologist and volunteer firefighter Evan Duffey is concerned that the fire can continue to create its own weather and more hazards and strains for firefighters.

“Given the high temperatures in the region reaching well in the 100s and how dry it has been, the chances of extreme fire danger are high,” Duffey said.

“Rapidly rising air caused by the extreme heat helps the fire to grow explosively as the fire will create its own wind, as well as fire vortices (firenadoes) and tree crowning (when the leaves get engulfed by flames), even on otherwise calm days.”